The Color Psychology of Pink
Pink is essentially a light red and is usually associated with love and romance. Pink is thought to have a calming effect. One shade known as "drunk-tank pink" is sometimes used in prisons to calm inmates. Sports teams sometimes paint the opposing teams locker room pink to keep the players passive and less energetic. While pink's calming effect has been demonstrated, researchers of color psychology have found that this effect only occurs during the initial exposure to the color. When used in prisons, inmates often become even more agitated once they become accustomed to the color.
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The Color Psychology of Purple
Having either purple or violet as your favorite color means you are sensitive and compassionate, understanding and supportive, thinking of others before yourself - you are the person others come to for help - being needed motivates you but sometimes people take advantage of you. You are a gentle and free spirit. Your feelings run deep and you can be quite sensitive to hurtful comments from others, although you would never show it.Being a personality color purple, you have a peaceful and tranquil quality and a quiet dignity about you. People are drawn to your charismatic and alluring energy.You are usually introverted rather than extroverted and may give the impression of being shy although this is not the case. You are creative and like to be individual in most of your endeavors, including your dress and home decoration - you love the unconventional. You are idealistic, and often impractical, with a great imagination, dreaming of a future in an ideal fantasy world where you exclude the ugly side of reality - you tend to look at life through rose-colored glasses. People who don't understand you sometimes think you are eccentric because you spend so much time in your fantasy world. With your personality color purple you inspire others with your creative thinking and your ability to deal positively with adversity. You are very intuitive and quite psychic or at least interested in spiritual growth or the occult - you seek spiritual fulfillment. You look for the meaning of life. As a personality color purple, you are a generous giver, asking for little in return except friendship.You can be secretive, with even your closest friends not really knowing you well.
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The Color Psychology of Blue
Blue is described as a favorite color by many people and is the color most preferred by men. Blue calls to mind feelings of calmness or serenity. It is often described as peaceful, tranquil, secure, and orderly. Blue can also create feelings of sadness or aloofness. Blue is often used to decorate offices because research has shown that people are more productive in blue rooms. Blue is one of the most popular colors, but it is one of the least appetizing. Some weight loss plans even recommend eating your food off of a blue plate. Blue rarely occurs naturally in food aside from blueberries and some plums. Also, humans are geared to avoid foods that are poisonous and blue coloring in food is often a sign of spoilage or poison. Blue can also lower the pulse rate and body temperature.
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The Color Psychology of Turquoise
Turquoise helps to open the lines of communication between the heart and the spoken word. It presents as a friendly and happy color enjoying life. In color psychology, turquoise controls and heals the emotions creating emotional balance and stability. In the process it can appear to be on an emotional roller coaster, up and down, until it balances itself. A combination of blue and a small amount of yellow, it fits in on the color scale between green and blue. It radiates the peace, calm and tranquility of blue and the balance and growth of green with the uplifting energy of yellow. If this is your favorite color, you are friendly and approachable, easy to communicate with. You are compassionate, empathetic and caring. You have a heightened sense of creativity and sensitivity. You speak from the heart and love sharing your inner most thoughts.
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The Color Psychology of Green
Green is a cool color that symbolizes nature and the natural world. Green also represents tranquility, good luck, health, and jealousy. Researchers have also found that green can improve reading ability. Some students may find that laying a transparent sheet of green paper over reading material increases reading speed and comprehension. Green has long been a symbol of fertility and was once the preferred color choice for wedding gowns in the 15th-century. Even today, green M & M's (an American chocolate candy) are said to send a sexual message. Green is often used in decorating for its calming effect. For example, guests waiting to appear on television programs often wait in a “green room” to relax. Green is thought to relieve stress and help heal. Those who have a green work environment experience fewer stomachaches. Consider how green is used in language: green thumb, green with envy, greenhorn.
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The Color Psychology of Yellow
This color relates to acquired knowledge. It is the color which resonates with the left or logic side of the brain stimulating our mental faculties and creating mental agility and perception. Being the lightest hue of the spectrum, the color psychology of yellow is uplifting and illuminating, offering hope, happiness, cheerfulness and fun. In the meaning of colors, yellow inspires original thought and inquisitiveness. Yellow is creative from a mental aspect, the color of new ideas, helping us to find new ways of doing things. It is the practical thinker, not the dreamer.Yellow is the best color to create enthusiasm for life and can awaken greater confidence and optimism. The color yellow loves a challenge, particularly a mental challenge. Within the meaning of colors, yellow is the great communicator and loves to talk. Yellow is the color of the networker and the journalist, all working and communicating on a mental level. Yellow is the scientist, constantly analyzing, looking at both sides before making a decision; methodical and decisive. Yellow is the entertainer, the comic, the clown. Yellow helps with decision making as it relates to clarity of thought and ideas, although it can often be impulsive. Yellow helps us focus, study and recall information, useful during exam time. The color yellow can be anxiety producing as it is fast moving and can cause us to feel agitated. Yellow has a tendency to make you more mentally analytical and critical - this includes being self critical as well as critical of others. Yellow is non-emotional, coming from the head rather than the heart. Yellow depends on itself, preferring to not get emotionally involved. Yellow is related to the ego and our sense of self worth, to how we feel about ourselves and how we are perceived by others.
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The Color Psychology of Orange
The color orange radiates warmth and happiness, combining the physical energy and stimulation of red with the cheerfulness of yellow. Orange relates to 'gut reaction' or our gut instincts, as opposed to the physical reaction of red or the mental reaction of yellow. Orange offers emotional strength in difficult times. It helps us to bounce back from disappointments and despair, assisting in recovery from grief.The color psychology of orange is optimistic and uplifting, rejuvenating our spirit. In fact orange is so optimistic and uplifting that we should all find ways to use it in our everyday life, even if it is just an orange colored pen that we use. Orange brings spontaneity and a positive outlook on life and is a great color to use during tough economic times, keeping us motivated and helping us to look on the bright side of life. With its enthusiasm for life, the color orange relates to adventure and risk-taking, inspiring physical confidence, competition and independence. Those inspired by orange are always on the go! In relation to the meaning of colors, orange is extroverted and uninhibited, often encouraging exhibitionism or, at the very least, showing-off! The color orange relates to social communication, stimulating two way conversations. A warm and inviting color, it is both physically and mentally stimulating, so it gets people thinking and talking! At the same time, orange is also stimulating to the appetite. If you love having people around the kitchen table, orange will keep them talking and eating for a long time. Many restaurants use pastel versions of orange, such as apricot or peach or deeper versions such as terracotta, for their décor as they are more subtle than red, yet still increase the appetite and promote conversation and social interaction, which in turn encourages patrons to have a good time and to eat and drink more. The color orange is obviously the worst color to have in the kitchen if you are trying to lose weight! Orange aids in the assimilation of new ideas and frees the spirit of its limitations, giving us the freedom to be ourselves. At the same time it encourages self-respect and respect of others. Orange is probably the most rejected and under-used color of our time. However, young people do respond well to it as it has a degree of youthful impulsiveness to it.
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The Color Psychology of Brown
The color brown is a serious, down-to-earth color signifying stability, structure and support. Relating to the protection and support of the family unit, with a keen sense of duty and responsibility, brown takes its obligations seriously. It encourages a strong need for security and a sense of belonging, with family and friends being of utmost importance. In the meaning of colors, brown is the color of material security and the accumulation of material possessions. The color brown relates to quality in everything - a comfortable home, the best food and drink and loyal companionship. It is a color of physical comfort, simplicity and quality. From a negative perspective it can also give the impression of cheapness and stinginess in certain circumstances. Brown is friendly and approachable. It is loyal, trustworthy and dependable in a practical and realistic way. In color psychology, brown is honest, genuine and sincere. It relates to the hardworking, the industrious and reliable, with both feet planted firmly on the ground. It is sensual, sensitive and warm, engulfing one in a feeling of calmness and comfort. It is a practical and sensible color which implies common sense. It hides the dirt! The color brown is associated with wholesome, natural and organic produce and anything related to the great outdoors, agriculture and farming. Brown is a frugal color - it is not associated with frivolity, excess or waste in any form. While it is materialistic, it values quality above all else, and everything in moderation. Some browns can show a degree of sophistication or elegance, depending on other colors associated with the brown. For example, brown with a soft white or ivory can appear stylish and classy, although more casual than black with soft white or ivory.
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The Color Psychology of Red
This color is a warm and positive color associated with our most physical needs and our will to survive. It exudes a strong and powerful masculine energy. Red is energizing. It excites the emotions and motivates us to take action. It signifies a pioneering spirit and leadership qualities, promoting ambition and determination. It is also strong-willed and can give confidence to those who are shy or lacking in will power. Being the color of physical movement, the color red awakens our physical life force. It is the color of sexuality and can stimulate deeper and more intimate passions in us, such as love and sex on the positive side or revenge and anger on the negative. It is often used to express love, as in Valentine’s Day, however it relates more to sexuality and lust, rather than love – love is expressed with pink. At its most positive it can create life with its sexual energy, or use its negative expression of anger and aggression to fuel war and destruction. The color red can stimulate the appetite, often being used in restaurants for this purpose. It also increases craving for food and other stimuli. Being surrounded by too much of the color red can cause us to become irritated, agitated and ultimately angry. Too little and we become cautious, manipulative and fearful. In Eastern cultures such as China red is the color for good luck. Although times are changing and many Chinese brides now wear white, it is traditionally the color for weddings. In Indian culture it symbolizes purity and is often used in their wedding gowns.
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The Color Psychology of White
White is color at its most complete and pure, the color of perfection. The color meaning of white is purity, innocence, wholeness and completion. In color psychology white is the color of new beginnings, wiping the slate clean, so to speak. It is the blank canvas waiting to be written upon. While white isn't stimulating to the senses, it opens the way for the creation of anything the mind can conceive. White contains an equal balance of all the colors of the spectrum, representing both the positive and negative aspects of all colors. Its basic feature is equality, implying fairness and impartiality, neutrality and independence. It is interesting to note that babies come into the world with a perfect balance of white, ready to imprint their lives with all the colors of the spectrum (hopefully!) from all their life experiences. White is totally reflective, awakening openness, growth and creativity. You can't hide behind it as it amplifies everything in its way. The color white is cleanliness personified, the ultimate in purity!! This is why it is traditionally worn by western brides, and the reason why doctors wear white jackets. White is a color of protection and encouragement, offering a sense of peace and calm, comfort and hope, helping alleviate emotional upsets. It creates a sense of order and efficiency, a great help if you need to declutter your life. White offers an inner cleansing and purifying of your thoughts, emotions and, ultimately, your spirit, refreshing and strengthening your entire energy system. While there are very few negative connotations to white, particularly in western culture, too much white can be cold, isolating and empty. It implies a feeling of sterility, detachment and disinterest, providing little stimulation for the senses. In other cultures it is traditionally related to death and mourning. In these cultures death usually means the end of one life and the beginning of another, moving forward to a new life, so the color psychology meaning of new beginnings still holds. White may indicate the completion of a cycle in your life - you may find you have a desire for white clothing or white in your surroundings at a time when you are moving in a new direction in your life - for example, planning an overseas trip for the first time, or moving house after a long time in one place, or in seeking a new relationship or a new career direction. Many people use white as a recall of their youth and innocence. It reminds them of a time when their lives were easier and less complicated. White is used in many medical practices such as dental surgeries and doctors' rooms as an indication of cleanliness and efficiency; however it also can give the feeling of sterility and coldness of emotions and may lead patients to think the doctor or dentist won't relate to them on an emotional and personal level. It can be too clinical and sterile. Too much white can cause feelings of isolation and emptiness; it can be too pristine and immaculate, making you feel as though you can't make a move for fear of upsetting it or creating a mess.
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The Color Psychology of Gray
The color gray is an unemotional color. It is detached, neutral, impartial and indecisive - the fence-sitter. From a color psychology perspective, gray is the color of compromise - being neither black nor white, it is the transition between two non-colors. The closer gray gets to black, the more dramatic and mysterious it becomes. The closer it gets to silver or white, the more illuminating and lively it becomes. Being both motionless and emotionless, gray is solid and stable, creating a sense of calm and composure, relief from a chaotic world. The color gray is subdued, quiet and reserved. It does not stimulate, energize, rejuvenate or excite. In the meaning of colors, gray is conservative, boring, drab and depressing on the one hand and elegant and formal on the other, yet never glamorous. Gray conforms - it is conventional, dependable and practical. It is a color of maturity and responsibility, associated with the gray hair of old age. It will never be the centre of attention, the dynamic leader or the director - it is too safe and toned down. The color gray can stifle and depress energy but it is also the stable base from which the new and positive can come. Gray is controlled. It has a steadying effect on other colors with which it comes into contact, toning down the stronger and brighter colors and illuminating the softer colors. Rarely is gray a perfect mix of black and white - it often has elements of other colors such as blue, green, pink, mauve or yellow within it which lift it and energize it. Too much of the color gray creates sadness and depression and a tendency to loneliness and isolation. Add some color to change this. Most people are indifferent to gray- it relates to the corporate worker in the gray suit - conservative, reliable, formal and independent and maybe boring.
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The Color Psychology of Black
Black absorbs all light in the color spectrum. Black is often used as a symbol of menace or evil, but it is also popular as an indicator of power. It is used to represent treacherous characters such as Dracula and is often associated with witchcraft. Black is associated with death and mourning in many cultures. It is also associated with unhappiness, sexuality, formality, and sophistication. In ancient Egypt, black represented life and rebirth. Black is often used in fashion because of its slimming quality. Consider how black is used in language: Black Death, blackout, black cat, black list, black market, black tie, black belt.
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